Career Change Inspiration Career Changers

The pain of changing career when you don’t want it

The feeling of being forced out of a career you love can cause a rush of emotions, as your identity is embedded in what you do. A career for many is not just a job, but it can be a daily routine, self-esteem and self-confidence, professional identity or a feeling of control over your life.

Changing career is often the only choice we have

Forced to change your career, when you don’t want to? It can be frightening and stressful to switch. Change, however, is often the only choice we have, even though it entails taking a more difficult path. According to career transition figures, the average person will change careers 5-7 times during their working life. Many pursue a direction until, unexpectedly, one day, they wake up and remember they don’t like what we’re being paid to do. For some, this isn’t a choice.

The Covid-19 pandemic had created a lot of job shifting

During these uncertain times, the Covid-19 pandemic, has created a lot of job shifting, and for many, have been unexpected. The latest figures from office for national statistics (ONS) showed the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has had a significant impact on the UK labour market so far. From January to June 2020, the results showed workers changed occupation, over half (52.6%) are men, 26.9% aged 35 to 49 years and 26.9% are aged 50 to 64 years.

Pilots, one of the most affected categories

Since some businesses will never recover, and others will re-open in a completely different form post pandemic. Many people who have changed their career will not be able to return to the same sort of work. It’s no secret that the airline pilots have been struggling as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. As many airlines across the world remain grounded, many pilots have had to leave their jobs and search for something new. The first worldwide study of 2,600 pilots by UK-based GOOSE Recruiting and business publication FlightGlobal, published in January 2021, showed 43% were doing the job they had trained for, with 30% unemployed, 17% furloughed and 10% in non-flying roles. 84% of those unemployed said it was due to the pandemic.

According to new figures from Totaljobs, as a result of the Coronavirus, 70% of employees are now more likely to consider working in a different sector, citing a desire to learn new skills or challenge themselves (51%), a need for a better work-life balance (43%) or a wish for greater job security (32%) as some of the reasons.

Being forced out of a career you love can cause a rush of emotions

Aside from the financial distress career changing can cause, the stress of losing a job can be overwhelming on our identity, especially when changing careers is something you did not want. Forced out of a career you love can cause a rush of emotions, as your identity is embedded in what you do, as many careers are built over the years. A career for many is not just a job, but it can be a daily routine, self-esteem and self-confidence, professional identity or a feeling of control over your life. . It can, however, also unlock doors and lead to amazing and unforeseen opportunities.

Careers are very important in people’s lives. It provides many with satisfaction and a social atmosphere. Majority spend 40 hours a week at work, so much time, that it needs to be rewarding, and bring happiness. Between 2000 and 2018 a study by ONS shows the number of people changing jobs. The rate of job changing is on average, 9.1% compared with 90.9% of people remaining in their jobs. Many people work jobs that are not ideal for them, but it can be difficult to make that move. If you are trying to determine when it is time to move on, consider some of the reasons why.

– Frustration and disillusionment.

– Redundancy or business closure.

– Realignment of personal or spiritual values

– Dislike of the organizational culture.

– Wanting more money

Uncertainty is the largest obstacle while changing career

For many, the uncertainty is the largest obstacle they encounter in their job transformation. They want to improve, but they don’t want to put the safety they have in their current employment at risk. A survey by Joblist discovered those who changed their career were happy with their decision. The positive emotions included becoming happier 77%, more satisfied 75%, more fulfilled 69%, and less stressed  65%. 80% of those said they wished they had made the change sooner.


Did you feel connected with “The pain of changing career when you don’t want it”? Discover how others have overcome their challenges by reading their career change stories.

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